Media and Facts

Media and Facts

For media enquiries please contact: Joe Tooma by email or phone 0419 481 472 or Liz Ham by email or phone 0413 085 279. 

Global Statistics 2020

  • Worldwide, cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer affecting women (ranking fourth for both incidence and mortality)1.
  • In 2018, an estimated 570,000 women were diagnosed with cervical cancer worldwide, and over 311,000 women died from the disease1.

Australian Statistics 2020

  • Cervical cancer was the 14th most commonly diagnosed cancer among females in Australia in 2015. In 2019, it is estimated that it will remain the 14th most commonly diagnosed cancer among females2.
  • In 2019, an estimated 951 new cases of cervical cancer were diagnosed in women in Australia, and an estimated 256 women died from the disease2.
  • Indigenous women are 2.5 times as likely to develop cervical cancer, and 3.5 times as likely to die from cervical cancer than non-Indigenous Australian women3.
  • The five-year survival rate for women diagnosed with cervical cancer (measured between 2011-2015) is 74%4. In comparison, breast and prostate cancers have a five-year survival rate of 91% and 95.2% respectively4.
  • Currently, only 55.4% of eligible Australian women are screening as frequently as recommended (women aged 20-69 between 2015 - 2016). This means that almost 45% of eligible Australian women have either never-screened, or are lapsed screeners (have not screened for sometime)5.
  • Over 70% (72%) of cervical cancers occur in women who have never-screened or who were lapsed screeners (had not screened for some time)5.
  • Cervical cancers detected through cervical screening are less likely to cause death. This is due to the fact that cervical cancers diagnosed through screening are generally detected earlier5.
  • In 2017, 80.2% of females and 75.9% of males aged 15 years had received all 3 doses of the HPV vaccine6.
  • In 2019, it is estimated that the age-standardised incidence rate will be 7.2 cases per 100,000 females2. The incidence rate for cervical cancer is expected to be highest for age groups 40–44, followed by age groups 30–34 and 35–392.
References

  1. Bray F, Ferlay J, Soerjomataram I, Siegel R, Torre L, Jemal A. Global cancer statistics 2018: GLOBOCAN estimates of incidence and mortality worldwide for 36 cancers in 185 countries. CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians. 2018;68(6):394-424.
  2. Cervical cancer in Australia statistics. Cervical cancer [Internet]. Cervical-cancer.canceraustralia.gov.au. 2020[cited 18 March 2020]. Available from: https://cervical-cancer.canceraustralia.gov.au/statistics
  3. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2019. Cervical screening in Australia 2019. Cancer series no. 123. Cat. no. CAN 124. Canberra: AIHW. p.67;72.
  4. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2019. Cancer in Australia 2019. Cancer series no.119. Cat. no. CAN 123. Canberra: AIHW. p.78.
  5. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2019. Analysis of cervical cancer and abnormality outcomes in an era of cervical screening and HPV vaccination in Australia. Cancer series no. 126. Cat. no. CAN 129. Canberra: AIHW.
  6. Coverage Data - National HPV Vaccination Program Register [Internet]. Hpvregister.org.au. 2020 [cited 18 March 2020]. Available from: http://www.hpvregister.org.au/research/coverage-data

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